Mon, 06 Dec 2021 Today's Paper

Sri Lanka’s messy vaccination affair

9 April 2021 01:43 am - 11     - {{hitsCtrl.values.hits}}

A A A

Experts observe lapses in COVID vaccine administration and documentation 

People gathered in large numbers to get vaccinated when Sri Lanka received the first set of vaccines

 

Sri Lanka commenced its COVID vaccination programme with much fanfare last January. Frontline healthcare workers, military personnel and those at immediate risk were vaccinated first. The government then decided to vaccinate people above 60. Subsequently, the government announced that it would vaccinate any and all people, even those below 30. Three months later, State Minister of Primary Healthcare, Epidemics and COVID Disease Control Sudarshani Fernandopulle announced that the COVID vaccination programme will be temporarily suspended as the government hadn’t been able to secure vaccines from Serum Institute of India. However, on the same day she reiterated that the vaccination drive would begin from April 19. Reportedly, a little over 900,000 people out of the 21 million people have so far been vaccinated. Apart from haphazard vaccination drives, medical experts also have raised concerns over haphazard approval processes that have been implemented in order to give clearance to certain vaccines.   
 

Incomplete documentation creates a stir

When Sri Lanka received its first donation of Sinopharm vaccines, several medical experts raised concerns over incomplete documentation and certain technical issues. This prompted decision makers to sack few experts who opposed the approval process. However, the country’s drug regulator, the National Medicines Regulatory Authority (NMRA) is still in the process of getting the clearance to inoculate the public with the vaccine in question.   
“When a country is accepting a donation from another country the receiving country should ensure that these items are firstly regulated in their country,” opined one of the experts who spoke on conditions of anonymity. “The country of origin should then present this information to the country that is receiving their products. If we are receiving some vaccines, then the NMRA will ask for a set of documents. These include Phase I-III trials, stability of the vial, safety and efficacy among other data.”  

"When Sri Lanka received its first donation of Sinopharm vaccines, several medical experts raised concerns over incomplete documentation and certain technical issues"

“At least safety and efficacy data needs to be cleared. But the expert panel has observed that the submissions lack those data. All vaccines Sri Lanka received including Oxford AstraZeneca, Russian manufactured Sputnik were also approved adhering to this process. If the vaccine isn’t approved by the WHO or U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA) all data related to Phase III clinical trials have to be submitted to the local regulator, NMRA.”  
The panel of experts have raised concerns particularly because they haven’t received these data to date. “Granting approval without scrutinising such data would be a detrimental precedent. Every vaccine presented for approval should be approved only by adhering to the proper methodology.”  

"A vaccine is administered to healthy, disease-free people. Therefore it is essential to approve a vaccine only after carefully evaluating its side effects and life-threatening effects"

The experts observe that a possible reason for the delay maybe that a large population is required to test the efficacy of a vaccine and by the time phase III trials began, China may have controlled the spread of the disease and may not have had sufficient number of patients. During a Phase III trial around 10,000-40,000 people or even more are vaccinated. They go through what is called a ‘double blind trial.’ Here you take 5000 people and vaccinate 2500 of them while giving a placebo to the remaining lot. Then you follow them for five or six months and wait until around 100 people get COVID. When they get a fever they are checked for COVID and this continues. When 100 people get COVID around 50 have gotten the vaccine. This means the vaccine isn’t effective. The level of antibodies among people who received the vaccine and those who didn’t also needs to be checked. This is what you call efficacy.   

"Five critically important areas need to be considered when selecting a suitable vaccine. These include WHO approval, safety, efficacy, physical environment and logistics suitable for the vaccine and cost-effectiveness"

A vaccine is administered to healthy, disease-free people. Therefore it is essential to approve a vaccine only after carefully evaluating its side effects and life-threatening effects,” the expert added.   

Vaccine mess

The Daily Mirror also learned that Sri Lankan government has paid for 1.5 million vaccine doses but has received only 500,000 vaccines. This means one million of them are pending. Around 240,000 doses have been given to the public. Another 264,000 vaccines were received under the COVAX facility. The WHO said that they were supposed to provide vaccines for 20% of the population which is around 8.4 million vaccines and later said that they would give vaccines to suffice 27% of the population. This is roughly 10 million vaccines. However Sri Lanka didn’t receive vaccines in March and is looking forward to receiving it this April. Meanwhile, Health Minister Pavithra Wanniarachchi said in Parliament yesterday that the second doses of Oxford AstraZeneca vaccines will be made available to the public from April 23 to July 6.   

"Sri Lankan government has paid for 1.5 million vaccine doses but has received only 500,000vaccines. This means one million of them are pending."

Second dose could be given in three months 

While stating that he was unaware of the circumstances that prompted the sacking of medical experts who opposed the approval of the Sinopharm vaccine, Committee on Public Accounts (COPA) Chairman Prof. Tissa Vitharana said that usually a committee of experts are appointed to decide on the vaccine that is best suited for the people. “They would decide on cost and other factors prior to distributing it to the public. There are important tests that need to be complete and experts need to be satisfied with the results. These are all technical aspects.”  
When asked about the delay in getting the second dose of vaccines, Prof. Vitarana who is also a consultant virologist said that usually the booster is given 3-4 weeks after the first dose. “But studies conducted abroad have revealed that the booster level is optimal if the second dose is given within three months. A booster is given for maximum defense,” he added.  

"Studies conducted abroad have revealed that the booster level is optimal if the second dose is given within three months. A booster is given for maximum defence"

Questions unanswered

“Those who got the first vaccine could wait up to 12 weeks as per available data,” opined Consultant Family Physician Dr. Ruvais Haniffa. “But we had our first dose in February. The two main concerns are with regard to clinical and logistical delays. The body reacts in certain ways and the second dose could be given within two to 12 weeks. Whether it could be given in three months is yet to be revealed as they haven’t updated data based on new studies as yet.”   

"Right now we have only inoculated a fraction of people in Western Province but we need to vaccinate the entire population and it would roughly take around two years."

Observing the logistical delay, Dr. Haniffa said that the decision makers haven’t given any explanation as to why the second dose isn’t given as yet. “The first dose was given to frontline health workers and other individuals. So we do not know if we have run out of stocks or whether we couldn’t procure the vaccine or whether there is a genuine delay. Under the COVAX facility, the WHO was supposed to give us vaccines free-of-charge. But we received the first quota of vaccines and not the second. People still have first round immunity and this is also a matter that concerns the rights of people. Are we to demand for the second dose or are we at the mercy of the government?” he questioned.   

"Those who got the first vaccine could wait up to 12 weeks as per available data
- Consultant Family Physician Dr. Ruvais Haniffa"

 

 

Emergency use approval 

Expressing their concerns regarding the issuance of the Sinopharm vaccine, the Government Medical Officers’ Association (GMOA) in a statement said that five critically important areas need to be considered when selecting a suitable vaccine. These include WHO approval, safety, efficacy, physical environment and logistics suitable for the vaccine and cost-effectiveness. “Out of the above criteria, at least an Emergency Use Approval from WHO is required to ensure the vaccines’ safety and efficacy. The GMOA therefore requests relevant authorities to consider all of the above factors before vaccinating the public from a new vaccine brand.   

"Sri Lanka received 1,264,000 vaccines from the covishield facility but India has suspended exporting vaccines due to the rapid spread of the virus."
- Ravi Kumudesh

 

 

Sri Lanka running out of vaccines?

“Sri Lanka received 1,264,000 vaccines from the COVISHIELD facility but India has suspended exporting vaccines due to the rapid spread of the virus,” opined Ravi Kumudesh, President of the Sri Lanka Association of Government Medical Laboratory Technologists.  “It has always been said that when giving a first dose of a vaccine, the second dose also needs to be considered. Therefore if we received one million vaccines, only 500,000 should be given to the public. The entire world is running out of vaccines, even developed countries. There’s a speed at which vaccines are being developed. We have so far given around 900,000 vaccines out of the total and only around 200,000 are remaining. The second dose is particularly important during the formation of antibodies.”  
He further said that when one vaccine is given it is not advisable to give another vaccine. “Therefore this is a deliberate mistake done by the government. What needs to be done is to get down the remaining doses of vaccines and continue the programme.”  

Two years needed to vaccinate entire population

“We have completed giving more than half the number of vaccines we received,” said Chief Epidemiologist Dr. Sudath Samaraweera. “Those who got the first dose will get the second within 10-12 weeks. We will be able to give the second dose if we start getting them from next month. Right now we have only inoculated a fraction of people in Western Province but we need to vaccinate the entire population and it would roughly take around two years.”   

"We have completed giving more than half the number of vaccines we received
- Chief Epidemiologist Dr. Sudath Samaraweera"

 

 

When asked about vaccines the country is supposed to receive under the COVAX facility, Dr. Samaraweera said that they haven’t received a confirmation as to when they would receive it.   
He further said that the Sinopharm vaccine is still being given to Chinese nationals and once a stringent regulatory authority assess information on the safety of the vaccine and issues a clearance, that they will start giving it to the public.  
Several attempts to contact State Minister of Production, Supply and Regulation of Pharmaceuticals Prof. Channa Jayasumana proved futile. 

 

  Comments - 11

  • Ranaweera Friday, 09 April 2021 11:57 AM

    Vaccine programs in many countries were not smooth due to high demand and supply chain issues. Only UK USA Israel and UAE have been so far successful due to their investment in Vaccine manufacturing process. Rest of the countries are way behind. Even in Canada and Australia and also most European countries , the vaccines have been given only to very few people. Sinopharm vaccine is being administered in many countries. Millions of people have received it. WHO recently declared that it was a safe Vaccine. No adverse side effects have been reported so far. Only our Sri Lankan media and doctors aligned with the west are not convinced about it. On top of these issues, India suspended exports which is typical selfish move by them confirming their unreliability. So the government has ordered Russian vaccine. Pfizer and Moderna are not available at all even for Canadians who ordered these before even WHO granted approval.

    German Friday, 09 April 2021 02:19 PM

    Ignorance is bliss

    Sanjeewa Friday, 09 April 2021 08:37 PM

    According to the website of the WHO the Sputnik V vaccine has still not been approved. In fact most of the required information is still pending. I am confused as to how then the NMRA approved the vaccine for Emergancy use in Sri Lanka. The GOSL has ordered several million doses of Sputnik V on the basis of the NMRA approval. The question to be answered is whether WHO approval is required for a vaccine to be approved by NMRA? Sinopharm on the other hand has been widely used in the UAE since December 2020. It is safe to assume that the UAE too has a highly professional approval process for vaccines that could be superior to our own.

    Somapala Saturday, 10 April 2021 05:27 AM

    Please stop your bull shitting!!!!

    Confused Friday, 09 April 2021 03:53 PM

    There are messy characters who are in charge and not doing things systematically and rightfully but only their talk.Pavithra, Sudharshani, Channel and even the chief Lalith W. Most of us Senior Citizens are still without even the first jab?

    Matt Friday, 09 April 2021 09:38 PM

    Agree in full. Silently accepting the inevitable.

    Kan Saturday, 10 April 2021 06:23 AM

    Now we realize why we’re branded as a 3rd world country.

    CHOLMONDELEY PINTO Saturday, 10 April 2021 07:28 AM

    If Chinese vaccine is proven safe by millions so far vaccinated in so many countries why are we waiting. If it has only 50 percent efficacy and no other vaccine is available are we waiting for.a second wave to hit to panic. Results of blind efficacy trials are not a essential factor in saving lives only side effects are important. Not the ego of the drug approving authority. It is a gift we are criticising and we may have to go begging to Chinese for the same if another wave its and we do not have any vaccine

    Ranaweera Saturday, 10 April 2021 09:51 AM

    Different countries have followed different approaches to decide who should get it first. Some have gone by age group by age group. The oldest got it first. Some countries have prioritised based on the risk of infection. Whoever at more risk of getting infected were given the vaccine first . Health care and other frontline workers got it first in those countries. Some have followed a mixed approach. What matters most is that vaccines are not wasted. In Sri Lanka, in general anything cannot be done systematically due to existence of large number of Pundits. We also have a large number of Provincial council politicians who interfere in everything. So under these difficilt circumstances, most eligible people including few who jumped the line got it. But comparing with many other countries we have still done it better than most of them

    Ranaweera Sunday, 11 April 2021 11:56 AM

    What i have commented is the truth, go and read international news and talk to those living in other countries or live in another country.

    Aussie Tuesday, 13 April 2021 01:41 AM

    Ranaweera: I Iive in another country as a Srilankan immigrant and I never heard of a country that give priority to the army, politicians and police. Except in Sri Lanka. So yes, vaccination program in Sri Lanka is a mess.


Add comment

Comments will be edited (grammar, spelling and slang) and authorized at the discretion of Daily Mirror online. The website also has the right not to publish selected comments.

Reply To:

Name - Reply Comment





A Sri Lankan giving dignified burials to unclaimed bodies for five decades

After their death, most people are memorialized at a service, surrounded by g

Focus on Laggala Gem mining big shots bigger than the law

The truth is now being uncovered regarding an illegal mining racket in state

How and why the TNA was formed twenty years ago

The Tamil National Alliance (TNA) is now twenty years of age. The premier pol

India lays emphasis on culture diplomacy with Sri Lanka

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi wanted to inaugurate the Kushinagar Inter