Fri, 20 May 2022 Today's Paper

The Grease Yaka Returns, again

26 February 2019 12:04 am - 0     - {{hitsCtrl.values.hits}}

A A A

Grease Yaka Returns is necessary to examine our nature as a country and our willingness to go down the rabbit holes of the past

The Grease Yaka has already seen a few avatars. Both in the form of a political fear-mongering device and a dramatic enterprise, undertaken by the topical and incisive team at Ananda Drama. Its latest manifestation attempts to take on one of the most conditioned and unnatural forms of social division, and through it, examine the futility of ‘othering’, of tribalism and the violent consequences that inevitably follow.   


For a country that in a very short time has seen two Leftist insurrections - infamous for their gruesome brutality - and also a three-decade-long conflict which pioneered devastating suicide bombing techniques, Sri Lanka certainly doesn’t learn its lessons very quickly. 


All these conflicts were fought among tribes. Tribes that had more in common than differences.   


Grease Yaka Returns is a study in how those commonalities are deliberately ignored, how old ties are severed for perceived new profits and differences energized. 
It is a study in how susceptible and volatile we are as a society. Conceptually, this is not a complex, abstract study as the evidence of our volatility is dispensed to us on a daily basis, in schools on the playing fields, in workplaces and – lest we forget – in Parliament. Grease Yaka Returns, drives it home without apology. 

 
The original version of Grease Yaka was ‘inspired’ by the actual social phenomenon which broke out a couple of years ago. The Grease Yaka, like the Goni Billa before it, are harbingers of a time of war, of uncertainty, and above everything else – fear. 


The play examines the political manoeuvres that most likely were behind the media sensation, and how political sociopaths engineer these distractions for gain. The original version showed how effectively the sheep-like populace reacted to the media frenzy. In that regard, the latest version stays true to its original format. Its graduation, however, from being a purely narrative piece portraying a slice of recent history, to an introspective device which intrinsic fear of the ‘other’, needs to be commended.   


Grease Yaka Returns begins with a casual enough scene of two siblings, and the sister’s boyfriend, looking out at the friendly neighbourhood pervert.   


It doesn’t take long for banter to turn into undercurrents of fear. 

 
“Is our creepy neighbour the Grease Yaka?” The script assumes that the urban legend of the Grease Yaka is already ubiquitous.   


The play continues with various settings – an office lunch room, a shoe shopping expedition, a bus stand - beginning in a similarly innocent fashion. Slowly, insidiously, the terror begins to build. The fear is heightened, and eventually, all hell breaks loose.


 This time, the differentiating device between the antagonists was not caste, creed, race or religion – as it was in the previous version, and often is, in real life. It was something far more accidental and far less constructed. It was complexion.   


It is necessary to draw a distinction between skin colour and complexion. Skin colour, in communities that are genetically diverse, can be a clear demarcation of race, and thereby, difference.   


However, in communities that are not as genetically diverse, communities that are geographically less disparate, skin colour per se, is not a differentiating feature. Sri Lankans abroad will recognize other Sri Lankans abroad, it doesn’t matter if they are ‘fair’ or ‘dark’ – they just have a lingering Sri Lankanness. However, Grease Yaka Returns deftly manages to create a divide even within this seemingly homogenous population.   


The play functions on the premise that the fear of the Grease Yaka has already been sown, if not fully germinated. At the start of the play, it is an abstract, amorphous, fear. Nothing specific. The fear of the unknown. Slowly the unknown starts being identified and labelled. It turns out to be a ‘fair’ vs. ‘dark’ divide. A division as visceral as it is ridiculous. A division that is subjective by its indefinability. And for those very reasons, the division that makes the most sense to the play’s goal.   


As a Sri Lankan society, we cannot pretend to be oblivious to the aspiration of ‘fairness’. Failed chocolate biscuit advertisements and skin whitening cream sales bear testament to our obsession with fairness. 


While this obsession does exist in society it has remained largely an individual one. One where jilted lovers may stare into the mirror and blame their skin or desperate parents will bemoan their combined genes for the inability to marry off their son or daughter.    A quick search of the classified matrimonial will reveal that ‘fair’ is one of the leading adjectives to describe both genders of a potential spouse. However, chances are that hopeful parents realize – or don’t realize – that their hitherto unmarried 90 kg daughter is as ‘slim’, as the neighbour’s ‘fair’ son has the complexion of barbecue coals. 

 

Slowly the unknown starts being identified and labelled. It turns out to be a ‘fair’ vs. ‘dark’ divide. A division as visceral as it is ridiculous. A division that is subjective by its indefinability. And for those very reasons, the division that makes the most sense to the play’s goal


 

The sliding scale of fairness lends itself to the hilarity of the division, and once the hilarity has subsided, reminds us of the chilling pathos of manufacturing divisions where there are none.   
Grease YakaReturns is clever. It takes hang-ups such as class divides, linguistic proficiency and wealth, and turns them on their heads.   


The ‘fair’ peon eventually turns the tables on his darker boss, as the office lunchroom divides into – for lack of a better denominator – the blacks and whites. The classist snob, who looks down his tanned nose at the girl buying the cheap shoes as his ‘fair, pretty’ wife (Possibly located off the matrimonial), eventually has to run for cover as his riches and snobbery cannot save him from the wrath of lighter complexioned plebs.   


The rise and fall of the individual characters in what is an ensemble piece are handled effectively and with care. The cues are subtle and the ability of the actors to move between roles and scenes is exceptional. For this genre, a little bit of ham is entirely excusable.   


The role of the media is excellently condemned in the play. The most elaborate scene is one where the entire cast watches snippets of popular culture on television. The vacant look of the viewers and their reactions to what they see on screen needed a little more clarity, but the scene was well devised. Perhaps a few tweaks in the staging will better illustrate how dependent on, and reactive we are, to what we are told by the media. The collective reactions to the ever-growing paranoia in the programmes being enacted could perhaps have been more precise, although the idea was excellent.


In its short duration of just over an hour, Grease Yaka Returns also managed to examine the growing commercial investment into the division. The fears of a mother grieving for her daughter’s complexion to be changed and the mercenary quack who ‘treats’ her daughter for her dark complexion with cream and injections are caricatures.   


But in a Sri Lankan society where the line between comedy and reality is ever blurring, the caricatures are all too familiar. The commercial exploitation of fear and conflict was laid bare, together with the disastrous consequences of such commercialisation. The play leaves us with a mother injecting her trussed up – previously carefree and happy – daughter with medicine against her complexion, in the hope that she would turn fair. Whether the daughter survives this remedy, remains tragically ambiguous.   


The scenes of actual conflict are well choreographed. It has not been that long since the JVP troubles of the late ‘80s. And Grease Yaka Returns takes us back to a time where warring factions, barely distinguishable from each other visit each other’s homes and hideouts to mete out reprisals, based on the colour of the target’s skin.   

 


While the narrative device remains ridiculous, the playing out of the scenes, is chillingly familiar to some of us, while – happily – a generation of under thirty year olds’ may not find the chaos and anarchy as ‘nostalgic’. 


Unsuspecting innocents being dragged out of their homes and executed is uncomfortable to watch even if it is only on stage. This discomfort was proportionately dealt to the audience amidst the scenes of outright comedy.   


There are two definitive sides, and, as always, politicians patronize the two factions, crystallising and exploiting previous fears into a ‘movement’. Misguided, trigger happy youth are mustered, assured of intangible ‘support’, and sent to the trenches while the fat cats spew rhetoric and enjoy the good life. The use of some actual political speeches from the early ‘80s is a nice touch by the directors and plainly shows how Sri Lanka is still stuck in a deeply divisive time warp, the fuse ever so close to being set off.   


While the concept of the play moved deftly over time, from race-related animosity to the less obvious, but more pervasive issue of complexion, the execution of the script did not move from the Oppressor vs Oppressed trope.   


The beauty of complexion, its subjectivity and its inability to be quantified or graded means that every ‘other’ is relative in skin tone. As such, there is no clear majority as there has been in previous Sri Lankan conflicts. However, Grease Yaka Returns makes out that one party – the fairer lot – are the Oppressors and the darker citizens the Oppressed.


In a majority situation, it is difficult not to root for the underdog, especially where irrational arbiters are used to create a divide. However, the thrust of the play is the very creation of that divide out of seeming nothingness, rather than the resolution of the conflict it creates.   


The writers, therefore, by choosing to portray one group as subversive, may have missed an opportunity to highlight our propensity to find division and ‘othering’ in any situation. This failing – if it can even be called that – is easily remedied with a few tweaks and edited lines. Yet, it may make a huge difference to take away.   


The directors have very deliberately chosen the actors with – again, for want of a better word – more ‘ambivalent’ skin tone to play the central roles. Some actors who fall into definitive roles have been cast as such. However, others remain impossible to label, despite fighting for one side or the other. Some scenes have a dark complexioned prisoner being dragged away by visibly darker skinned insurgents. The chaos and confusion are as deliberate as it could be real. Often the audience is unable to make a clear distinction between the sides during the ‘battle scenes’, and that sounds vaguely familiar.   


Grease Yaka Returns is a play that is necessary. Necessary to examine our nature as a country and our willingness to go down the rabbit holes of the past.


It is also a play that pragmatically portrays the various actors across social strata, that drive, manipulate and profit from fear-mongering.   


It also effectively exposes the general public as the gullible, reactive, fools they often can be gathering to create an avalanche of chaos. Grease Yaka Returns is genuinely satirical and keeps to the tenets that satire should. As a bilingual play, it needs to travel widely across Sri Lanka and is an important piece of theatre which should not be missed for its educational, as well as entertainment value. Even the most oblivious, uninformed audience member will identify with, and introspect on, at least one of its many, subtle layers.   

Order Gifts to Sri Lanka. See Kapruka's top selling online shopping categories such as Toys, Vegetables, Grocery, Flowers, Birthday Cakes, Fruits, Chocolates, Clothing and Electronics. Also see Kapruka's unique online services such as Money Remittence,News, Courier/Delivery, Food Delivery and over 700 top brands. Also get products from Amazon & Ebay via Kapruka Gloabal Shop into Sri Lanka.

Sell your vehicle & house fast with hitad.lk only cost is Rs.400, Advertise in Hitad.lk for free to sell your mobile phone. Want to sell your Pet, Advertise for Free in hitad.lk Search for Houses in Sri Lanka and find the best place through Hitad.lk find your best tuition place. Find the best partner for you, visit hitad.lk Find anything at any time hitad.lk.

  Comments - 0

Order Gifts to Sri Lanka. See Kapruka's top selling online shopping categories such as Toys, Vegetables, Grocery, Flowers, Birthday Cakes, Fruits, Chocolates, Clothing and Electronics. Also see Kapruka's unique online services such as Money Remittence,News, Courier/Delivery, Food Delivery and over 700 top brands. Also get products from Amazon & Ebay via Kapruka Gloabal Shop into Sri Lanka.

 

Sell your vehicle & house fast with hitad.lk only cost is Rs.400, Advertise in Hitad.lk for free to sell your mobile phone. Want to sell your Pet, Advertise for Free in hitad.lk Search for Houses in Sri Lanka and find the best place through Hitad.lk find your best tuition place. Find the best partner for you, visit hitad.lk Find anything at any time hitad.lk.


Add comment

Comments will be edited (grammar, spelling and slang) and authorized at the discretion of Daily Mirror online. The website also has the right not to publish selected comments.

Reply To:

Name - Reply Comment




Order Gifts to Sri Lanka. See Kapruka's top selling online shopping categories such as Toys, Vegetables, Grocery, Flowers, Birthday Cakes, Fruits, Chocolates, Clothing and Electronics. Also see Kapruka's unique online services such as Money Remittence,News, Courier/Delivery, Food Delivery and over 700 top brands. Also get products from Amazon & Ebay via Kapruka Gloabal Shop into Sri Lanka.

 

Sell your vehicle & house fast with hitad.lk only cost is Rs.400, Advertise in Hitad.lk for free to sell your mobile phone. Want to sell your Pet, Advertise for Free in hitad.lk Search for Houses in Sri Lanka and find the best place through Hitad.lk find your best tuition place. Find the best partner for you, visit hitad.lk Find anything at any time hitad.lk.


What’s next for the Sri Lankan Economy?

Monday’s briefing by Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe was a rude awakeni

Who do we subsidize through fuel subsidies?

The economic crisis, the outcome of months of mismanagement by the Gotabaya R

“The interim government should operate for one year”- Champika Ranawaka

Samagi Jana Balawegaya (SJB) MP Patali Champika Ranawaka in an interview with

Constitutional Reform for ‘System Change’

A peaceful democratic ‘revolution’ is sweeping across Sri Lanka. It is a