CCC to hold workshop on food risk communication

6 November 2019 07:14 am - 0     - {{hitsCtrl.values.hits}}

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The Ceylon Chamber of Commerce will be organising a workshop on Food Risk Communication, in collaboration with the Food Industry Asia (FIA).


Dr. Andrew Roberts, author of the FIA Food Risk Communication Toolkit, will introduce and clarify theoretical aspects of Food Risk Communication, and outline pragmatic approaches on how to deal with the entire range of food risks. 


This will cover traditional and modern food safety methods, health and nutrition advocacy, critical incident interventions, and more.


The sessions aim to identify industry priorities and roles, and disseminate the vision of food risk communication with risk management institutes and country regulators. The key focus areas will also look at problems, solutions, challenges, and opportunities for food risk communication across Asia.


Participants will learn about a holistic approach to food risk communication, understand how to deploy the FIA toolkit modules, and how best practices of multi-sectoral collaboration between all players in the food system could be implemented towards testing and refining food risk communication practices. 


The workshop is scheduled to be held on November 25th, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Hilton Residencies.


For registrations or further information, contact Sriyani on 011 558 8877.

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