Lanka records upsurge in illegal drug seizures

15 October 2012 12:35 am - 4     - {{hitsCtrl.values.hits}}

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Law enforcement officials in Sri Lanka have documented an increase in illegal drug seizures since the end of a decades-long civil war in 2009, with activists pointing to lax law enforcement and political patronage as factors contributing to the apparently growing drugs trade.

Heroin and cannabis were the most common drugs seized nationwide, according to the government’s National Dangerous Drugs Control Board (NDDCB).

Some 19,000 suspects were arrested by the end of June 2012, in line with 2011 year-end arrest totals of 40,000, according to police superintendent Ajith Rohana.

Arrests have steadily climbed, based on police data, since the government declared victory in May 2009 over separatist rebels in the north who had fought for independence for decades. That year, the police arrested 19,000 on drug charges; the following year, drug arrests jumped to
almost 30,000.

Drug seizures are only one indicator to assess the level of illicit drug trafficking, according to Sri Lanka’s anti-narcotic
association.

Illegal drugs were already circulating during the conflict waged by the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE) against the government, according to Rohan Gunaratna, an analyst with the International Centre for Political Violence and Terrorism Research at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore.

“To transact and move heroin from India to Sri Lanka, LTTE’s most secretive structure — the intelligence wing — built a dedicated unit with cells in Tamil Nadu (state in southern India), Vanni (northern Sri Lanka) and (the capital) Colombo. Known as ‘brown sugar’, the heroin business was clandestine even to other members of the intelligence wing, including the leaders,” said Gunaratna.

The country is a now a transit point for drugs coming mostly from Pakistan, Afghanistan and India headed to Europe and
beyond, according to NDDCB.

Illicit drugs with an estimated street value of nearly $7.7mn have been seized from foreign drug dealers — mostly from Pakistan and India — during the first half of 2012, according to the control board.

Possession of heroin, morphine or opium in large quantities is punishable by death, according to the Poisons, Opium and Dangerous Drugs Ordinance that dates back to the mid-1980s.

According to NDDCB, the government and NGOs provide residential care treatment (including compulsory treatment since 2007) and rehabilitation services for drug abusers in Sri Lanka. NDDCB operates four residential treatment centres and outreach programmes in the cities of Colombo, Kandy, Galle and Urapola, which offer counselling, detoxification and psychotherapy, while the prison system has programmes for prisoners who abuse drugs.
Based on the government’s most recent treatment data, the reported number of persons treated for drug use island-wide was almost 3,000 in 2009. Most came through government-run centres (2,387), followed by prisons (522) and 65 came through NGOs.

Lack of resources and personnel have rendered such treatment efforts ineffective. (Source: IRIN)
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  Comments - 4

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  • Cobra Monday, 15 October 2012 01:48 AM

    To be the hub for everything was Sri Lanka's dream. wasn't it?

    Impartial Guy Monday, 15 October 2012 01:48 AM

    This alone indicates there is no law and order in the country. If anybody find dealing with any wrong doing,irrespective of influence and status he/she should be punished. This should start from the top and not from down. There should not be any political interference to the judiciary and Police commission and the Bribery commission should be introduced forthwith. Only introduction will not do,commissions should be able to function independently. Example must come from the top.

    Sumathipala Monday, 15 October 2012 03:06 AM

    There will be a further increase as the druglords are politicians and their sons with state protection.
    You see what happen to one intelligence officer which want to sneek into this.

    kaputakukula Monday, 15 October 2012 05:57 AM

    The other contributing factor is poverty due to "down trodden economy" (we see this in all poor countries).


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